Wisdom’s Seven Pillars – Pillar #4 Quietness –

“Wisdom has built her house, she has carved out her seven pillars:”
Proverbs 9:1.
The aim of this series is to present a non-cliche, non-religious point of view of wisdom. I do subscribe to some religious interpretations of the subjects addressed, but wish to here, only point out the common understanding of the principles.
 
 “Those who know do not talk. Those who talk do not know. Keep your mouth closed… this therefore is the highest state of man.”
– Tao Te Ching 56
 
“One who will not accept solitude, stillness and quiet recurring moments…is caught up in the wilderness of addictions; far removed from an original state of being and awareness. This is ‘dis-ease.”
T.F. Hodge,
From Within I Rise: Spiritual Triumph Over Death and Conscious Encounters with “The Divine Presence”

More harm is done to both reputation and relationships by my words more than any other thing I do. My first inclination should be quietness, calmness, and contemplation of the matter at hand. When I’m offended, hurt, or angry, I must keep my mouth shut, at least initially. Keeping the secrets and confidence placed on me, holding my thoughts and tongue, I protect myself and others. Talking about injustices done to me only keeps the hurt alive and fans the flames of anger. Quietness is a refuge, in contrast expressing my opinion at every turn is never necessary. There are times to express myself, but only when these conversations are governed by wisdom’s pillars. I must show restraint when my heart bursts to speak, when my stomach aches to exact verbal revenge on those who are against me, when my pride wants to tell everything I think I know. Holding my tongue and keeping knowledge and opinions to myself produces confidence and inspires the same in others around me. In quietness and confidence is my strength.
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Wisdom’s Seven Pillars – Pillar #2 Peace –

“Wisdom has built her house, she has carved out her seven pillars:” Proverbs 9:1. The aim of this series is to present a non-cliche, non-religious point of view of wisdom. I do subscribe to some religious interpretations of the subjects addressed, but wish to here, only point out the common understanding of the principles.  

If you want to make peace with your enemy, you have to work with your enemy. Then he becomes your partner.”
Nelson Mandela

“If we have no peace, it is because we have forgotten we belong to each other”
Pillar #2 Peace 

Wisdom will always seek a way to bring peace within myself and with others. Peace with myself always precedes peace with others. It’s imperative that I find a place of calmness, centered in myself and quiet in my thoughts and from that haven I influence my relationships  looking for ways to get along with my enemy, my friend, my spouse, and my nation. Haste has no room in this pursuit. Anger will rise tempting me to act impulsively but I must resist every urge to act quickly. Calmness, confidence, and quietness will be the lighthouses that guide me through the dire straights of relationships. Taking a deep breath, calming my emotions and raging thoughts, I find the peace that’s born from mother Wisdom.

Wisdom’s Seven Pillars – Pillar #5 Mercy –

“Wisdom has built her house, she has carved out her seven pillars:” Proverbs 9:1. The aim of this series is to present a non-cliche, non-religious point of view of wisdom. I do subscribe to some religious interpretations of the subjects addressed, but wish to here, only point out the common understanding of the principles.”
Pillar #5 – Mercy
 
“compassionate or kindly forbearance shown toward an offender,an enemy,or otherperson inone’s power” – Dictionary.com
 
I have always found that mercy bears richer fruits than strict justice.”
Abraham Lincoln
 
Mercy is crucial to wisdom, allowing it to function by bringing constructive resistance to the force of knowledge. It directs the power of wisdom to accomplish its highest objective, that of bringing and nurturing life. Without it, wisdom may be a cruel master, harsh and unrelenting. Religion, philosophy, intellectualism, and government, followed without mercy will surely end in violence and the destruction of the individual. I yield to the powers that be, hoping for mercy as I address my issues, learning that, as I expect it, and it is necessary for my growth, so I should express it in my dealings with others. There is no greater power than wisdom applied to a life with mercy as it’s arms to lift, to teach, to heal, and to encourage.
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Wisdom’s Seven Pillars – Pillar #7 A Higher Source

“Wisdom has built her house, she has carved out her seven pillars:” Proverbs 9:1. The aim of this series is to present a non-cliche, non-religious point of view of wisdom. I do subscribe to some religious interpretations of the subjects addressed, but wish to here, only point out the common understanding of the principles.”

Pillar #7 A Higher Source

On the mountains of truth you can never climb in vain: either you will reach a point higher up today, or you will be training your powers so that you will be able to climb higher tomorrow.”

Each of us is born with the potential for the unfolding of our true self. When you deviate from the truth, you are interfering with the intention of something greater than you are – call it nature or a higher power. As a result, you develop discomfort.”
– Unknown

Abstaining from religious cliche’s and forms makes describing this last pillar difficult. The idea is that wisdom must have a source, greater than itself to appeal to. Some call it a “higher power”, a philosophy, a teacher, a leader, or any number of nomenclatures, all referring to the idea that someone or something has the power to inspire me beyond egocentricity. Isolation cannot be tolerated, though it is useful for growth, wisdom must be exercised in real life scenarios. I can be wise on my own, but let an argument start between my brother and I, and watch as the heat of emotion finds the weaknesses of my solitude. The two must work together, wisdom hammered out on my own, but submitted to another higher source, tested outside of my safe zone. A higher source exists, it behooves you to find it, appeal to it, and listen to it.

Wisdom’s Seven Pillars – Pillar #7 A Higher Source

“Wisdom has built her house, she has carved out her seven pillars:” Proverbs 9:1. The aim of this series is to present a non-cliche, non-religious point of view of wisdom. I do subscribe to some religious interpretations of the subjects addressed, but wish to here, only point out the common understanding of the principles.”

Pillar #7 A Higher Source

On the mountains of truth you can never climb in vain: either you will reach a point higher up today, or you will be training your powers so that you will be able to climb higher tomorrow.”

Each of us is born with the potential for the unfolding of our true self. When you deviate from the truth, you are interfering with the intention of something greater than you are – call it nature or a higher power. As a result, you develop discomfort.”
– Unknown

Abstaining from religious cliche’s and forms makes describing this last pillar difficult. The idea is that wisdom must have a source, greater than itself to appeal to. Some call it a “higher power”, a philosophy, a teacher, a leader, or any number of nomenclatures, all referring to the idea that someone or something has the power to inspire me beyond egocentricity. Isolation cannot be tolerated, though it is useful for growth, wisdom must be exercised in real life scenarios. I can be wise on my own, but let an argument start between my brother and I, and watch as the heat of emotion finds the weaknesses of my solitude. The two must work together, wisdom hammered out on my own, but submitted to another higher source, tested outside of my safe zone. A higher source exists, it behooves you to find it, appeal to it, and listen to it.

Wisdom’s Seven Pillars – Pillar #6 Easily Entreated

“Wisdom has built her house, she has carved out her seven pillars:” Proverbs 9:1. The aim of this series is to present a non-cliche, non-religious point of view of wisdom. I do subscribe to some religious interpretations of the subjects addressed, but wish to here, only point out the common understanding of the principles.”
Pillar #6 Easily Entreated

In all debates, let Truth be thy aim, not Victory.”
‘Tis the glory of a man to vail to truth; as it is the mark of a good nature to be easily entreated.”


Wisdom is friendly to questions and petitions, entertaining them easily. Being available to answer questions and grant petitions, facilitates the growth of wisdom. I must be willing to accept that I may be wrong, in both my knowledge and/or the application of it. Entrenched ways or knowledge that refuse to entertain oppositions and petitions limits my understanding. Though the questions are tedious, though the petitions are continuous, I must apply myself to them, willingly and easily. Allowing questions to my beliefs, working my through my limited understanding, achieves the purest and simplest knowledge applicable to life’s challenges. Without being approachable and entertaining questions, wisdom will be corrupted by egocentric desires, my will overriding the greater good, and create a religion of Me.

Wisdom’s Seven Pillars – Pillar #3 – Seriousness

“Wisdom has built her house, she has carved out her seven pillars:” Proverbs 9:1. The aim of this series is to present a non-cliche, non-religious point of view of wisdom. I do subscribe to some religious interpretations of the subjects addressed, but wish to here, only point out the common understanding of the principles.  

– Helen Keller, (1880-1968) 

A continually full stomach, a life absent from suffering, void of enemies, full of fun and hedonistic pleasure, will make me soft and foolish, spoiled and demanding, empty of wisdom and hardened to its courting calls. Sorrow, the winds of adversity, great pressure and trouble, will keep me sharp and on my game. Seriousness is a gift born from suffering. Desire suffering over a life of ease and fullness. However it works in my life, wisdom requires a serious attitude to come of age. Foolish entertainments and company will corrupt good wisdom and good habits. I must beware of long periods of ease and content, it will likely fuel my descent away from wisdom. Embracing the hard times of life will make me fertile for the seeds of wisdom to take root, guarantee their fruitfulness, and an atmosphere ideal for their growth.