Burnt Bridges

“The only bad thing about burning your bridges behind you is that the world is round”

“That bridge you burn, in laughing pride walking on
Is the path that destiny forces to spawn
That one that is rejected will lead you the pawn
The day that died will be reborn atdawn.” – DMW




He laughed under the command of alcohol. With mockery his grand speech proclaimed the worthlessness of my life that he used to facilitate his riches. Needing his provision for my daily supply, I grew rebellious inside. The Boss continued his diatribe in the firelight. On my struggle he built his joy. My work, that though he taught it to me, stood alone in stark contrast to his proclamations. Joyfully he lit a match to burn the bridges and isolate me in shame. As the last timber fell in ashen dismay, the universe set in motion a turn of events that always humbles the proud. Within in months, he fell under the spell of my promotion and others saw to my advancement. The year ground on and then, in the new birth of spring, when burned things turn green again, his mistake of taking the common man for granted gave him a startling revelation. His work is now for me, and I, with humility, take his reigns and learn this, that all bridges will one day be crossed again, so be careful of the paths we leave behind. 

Wisdom’s Seven Pillars – Pillar #1 Humility

“Wisdom has built her house, she has carved out her seven pillars:” Proverbs 9:1. The aim of this series is to present a non-cliche, non-religious point of view of wisdom. I do subscribe to some religious interpretations of the subjects addressed, but wish to here, only point out the common understanding of the principles. 
Pillar #1 – Humility

“Humility must always be the portion of any man who receives acclaim earned in the blood of his followers and the sacrifices of his friends.”
Dwight D. Eisenhower

Humility is an attitude that understands others are just as important as myself. An attitude that looks to provide the needs of those around me by my hand. This pertains not only to a physical provision but to an emotional, mental, and spiritual provision. To be humble is to know I’m a servant to those around me, and gladly submit to that service, not as a slave, but as my brother’s keeper. It’s to joyfully give what’s mine to another to assist them, knowing that but for fortunate circumstance, I’d be the recipient; understanding that others have helped me get to this place and the willingness to carry on the tradition of sacrifice. 

Also published in Broowaha Magazine 

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