A Hiding Place – Notes on fear and safety

“There are no ‘if’s’ in God’s world. And no places that are safer than other places. The center of His will is our only safety – let us pray that we may always know it!”
Corrie ten Boom, The Hiding Place
Image Credit: 2sad-eyes

Safety is a relative term, as I can feel safe in places others can’t. The reverse is true as well, there are common things that cause me to feel threatened. Losing the feeling of safety is one of the effects of being the victim of a violent crime, especially a sexual assault. I despise this fear, and long for safety. Knowing better than to place my trust in a relationship, a group, a law, or even my own devices, I find that there is only one place I am completely sheltered, in the arms of my Father. When I am spending time with Him, He protects me and holds me, comforting me in my fears. There the feeling of safety is irrelevant, for in that moment I am truly safe. Who can touch me when His strong arms wrap my soul in warmth and his unending love comforts my conspiracies laden mind? Feelings of being safe will come if I discipline myself stay in that place where no man and no obscure terror can prevail. In that place I will sleep and laugh at the derision of men.

Also published in Broowaha Magazine 

02242012

The Art of Waiting – Sun Tzu applications

“Patience is power.
Patience is not an absence of action;
rather it is “timing”
it waits on the right time to act,
for the right principles
and in the right way.”
Fulton J. Sheen
 

Wisdom is better than strength. This sounds right, but to apply the principle is a complex matter. In layman’s terms, it requires me to use knowledge and timing rather than brute strength or force. Patience is a universal partner to this wisdom that excels strength. Patience involves waiting, waiting involves self control, a mastery of my emotions and will. Sun Tzu said, “ The good fighters of old first put themselves beyond the possibility of defeat, and then waited for an opportunity of defeating the enemy.” This waiting involves observation of self, as well as your problem or enemy. The purpose of this waiting is to be, “Disciplined and calm, to await the appearance of disorder and hubbub amongst the enemy:–this is the art of retaining self-possession.”

Another fine friend of wisdom, quietness, gives us further benefits. In most conflicts, a demonstration of strength, provoked by bravado and pride, is shown by an outpouring of threats and insults. These are made in order to conceal intentions, threaten peace, and incite a reaction. In direct contrast, Sun Tzu enlightens us with his application of a principle of quietness, hence, “In making tactical dispositions, the highest pitch you can attain is to conceal them; conceal your dispositions, and you will be safe from the prying of the subtlest spies, from the machinations of the wisest brains.”

Seven Faults Of Foolishness – Fault #3 A Multitude of Words

Fault #3 – A Multitude of Words

When words are scarce they are seldom spent in vain.”
William Shakespeare

The water in a vessel is sparkling; the water in the sea is dark. The small truth has words which are clear; the great truth has great silence.”
Rabindranath Tagore

‘When there are many words, transgression is unavoidable, but he who restrains his lips is wise.’ – Proverbs 10:19
There is a babble of words in the mouth of the foolish not unlike a dripping on a rainy afternoon; endlessly flowing, each word declaring its presence noisily. Not knowing the end of their desire for admiration and a delight in showing their knowledge, the fool will not put an end to his conversation. I’ve seen it, from my own mouth, where speaking, I said to much, to the wrong people, and a peaceful situation became inflamed with the babbling brook of a foolish tongue. Not only the number of words, but the timing, revealing secrets of those around, gossiping without concern, throwing fuel on the fires of contention. Nothing is sacred in the foolish discussions engaged and promoted.
Finding the foolish in a crowd is easy. Look for the one talking endlessly, with jokes pouring out and gossip spewing forth. This person will “know” everything or most certainly have an opinion that they will share vehemently on any subject, professing their endless knowledge of all subjects. Turning easy conversation into platforms of self aggrandization, the audience shake their heads, the fool not noticing the tide of acceptance turning against him. Contention will certainly surround this person.
Holding the tongue is difficult, success in it determined by long periods of self discipline, and a constant vigilance against the errors of it in common conversation, which things the fool is concerned with.